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Unit Details

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Instructions: Rockwood unit details share the timeline, the enduring understanding and the essential questions for each unit.  Click on the standard title to be directed to the information on related standards for the unit.​

 Unit Details

Unit Title
Forensics
Unit Number
AAB4
Course
Authentic Applications of Biochemistry
Content Area
Science
Description
Students will learn how to gather and observe critical pieces of forensic evidence. This allows students to investigate and analyze multiple sources of evidence and data to reach and defend an argument and/or explanation for a forensic investigation.
Timeline
Day(s)
Enduring Understandings
Crosscutting Concept-Patterns: Students will understand that different patterns may be observed at each of the scales at which a system is studied and can provide evidence for causality in explanations of phenomena.
Crosscutting Concept-Cause and Effect: Students will understand that empirical evidence is required to differentiate between cause and correlation and make claims about specific causes and effects.
Crosscutting Concept-Systems and System Models: Students will understand that systems can be designed to do specific tasks. Students will understand that models can be used to predict the behavior of a system, but these predictions have limited precision and reliability due to the assumptions and approximations inherent in models.
Crosscutting Concept-Energy and Matter: Students will understand that energy cannot be created or destroyed-it only moves between one place and another place, between objects and/or fields, or between systems.
Crosscutting Concept-Stability and Change: Students will understand that change and rates of change can be quantified and modeled over very short and very long periods of time. Some system changes are irreversible.
Crosscutting Concept-Scale, Proportion, and Quantity: Students will understand that algebraic thinking is used to examine scientific data and predict the effect of a change in one variable on another.
Nature of Science-Science is a Way of Knowing: Students will understand that science is both a body of knowledge that represents a current understanding of natural systems and the process used to refine, elaborate, revise, and extend this knowledge through questioning and defining problems.
Nature of Science-Science models, laws, mechanisms and theories explain natural phenomena: Students will understand that models, mechanisms, and explanations collectively serve as tools in the development of a scientific theory.
Nature of Science, Scientific Knowledge is Based on Empirical Evidence: Students will understand that science arguments are strengthened by coordinating patterns of evidence with current theory and multiple lines of evidence supporting a single explanation. Students will understand that scientific investigations use a variety of methods to collect empirical evidence and that investigations are revised based on evidence.
Nature of Science-Science as a Human Endeavor: Students will understand that scientists and engineers rely on human qualities such as persistence, precision, reasoning, logic, imagination and creativity. Students will understand that scientists and engineers are guided by habits of mind such as intellectual honesty, tolerance of ambiguity, skepticism, and openness to new ideas. Students will understand the importance of obtaining, evaluating and communicating information in light of these qualities and habits of mind.
 
 
Essential Questions
How can analysis of patterns at various scales provide evidence for the cause of a particular phenomena?
How can patterns in physical evidence predict the events of a crime scene or forensic investigation?
How can patterns in evidence help to identify a suspect or solve a case?
How can evidence be used to understand cause and effect relationships?
How does a projectile demonstrate conservation of energy and stability and change?
How can mathematical equations help determine trajectory of a projectile, determine a probable height and weight?
How do the characteristic physical properties of evidence help determine an unknown?
How can you analyze physical evidence to visually create and interpret graphical models?
How is science both a body of knowledge and a process of revision and inquiry?
Why is scientific knowledge open to revision?
What attributes of humans allow us to think like scientists and engineers?
 
Additional Unit Resources

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Standard
Standard Component
  
Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence that feedback mechanisms maintain homeostasis.
  
Apply concepts of statistics and probability to explain the variation and distribution of expressed traits in a population.
  
Ask and refine questions that can be empirically tested and that lead to descriptions and explanations of how the natural and designed world(s) work.
ECO
  
Use and construct models to predict and represent relationships among variables between systems and their components in the natural and designed worlds.
  
Apply mathematics and computational thinking to analyze, represent and model variables and/or data to determine relationships.
ECO
  
Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information from multiple sources in order to evaluate the merit and validity of claims, methods and designs.
  
Obtain, evaluate and communicate information about the roles people assume in careers related to science and STEM fields.
  
  
Standard
Standard Component
  
Analyze data to support the claim that Newton’s second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.
ECO
  
Apply scientific and engineering ideas to design, evaluate, and refine a device that minimizes the force on a macroscopic object during a collision.
ECO
  
Plan and carry out investigations in the field or laboratory, working collaboratively as well as individually, to provide evidence for and to test conceptual, mathematical, physical and empirical models.
ECO
  
Analyze and interpret data, introducing more detailed statistical analysis, the comparison of data sets for consistency, and the use of models in order to identify the significant features and patterns in the data.
ECO
  
Construct scientific explanations and design solutions to problems that are supported by multiple and independent student-generated sources of evidence consistent with scientific ideas, principles, and theories.
ECO
  
Engage in argument using sufficient evidence and scientific reasoning to defend and critique claims and explanations about the natural and designed world(s) in order to synthesize scientific explanations and develop solutions to problems.